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Rockefeller Center developer reveals first New York residential building

Curbed // Mar 06, 2019

The developer behind Rockefeller Center is working on its first New York residential building, a 600-foot condo tower on East 29th Street that will go by the name Rose Hill.

The tower’s moniker comes from its Nomad location between Madison and Park avenues that was once part of the 130-acre Rose Hill Farm estate purchased by James Watts in 1747. (Alas, Watts was a Loyalist and left the property not too long after though nods to the area’s old name can still be spotted around to this day.)

But the recall to the past doesn’t stop there: The tower, designed inside and out by CetraRuddy, takes heavy influence from the architecture of Rockefeller Center and will have a highly Deco-inspired facade.

The public details are still scant, but the here’s what we do know: The building is already on the rise on a site formerly occupied by four low-rise buildings at 30-36 East 29th Street. Rose Hill will have 123 condos that will be marketed by CORE when sales launch in the spring.

Though developer the Rockefeller Group has yet to officially reveal the building’s amenities, paperwork on file with the Department of Buildings says the amenities will include a gym, pool, squash courts, bike parking, and a tenant terrace on the building’s 34th floor.

The property’s teaser site just launched with a short video by Milan-born video and collage artist Marco Brambilla that emphasizes the building’s ties to the Rockefeller Group and its Art Deco influence.

Rose Hill is just one of a handful of new buildings in New York that call back to the era of early 20th century art and design, along with others like Roman and Williams’ The Fitzroy in Chelsea, and SHoP’s 111 West 57th Street in Midtown, which took heavy influence from the setback style depicted in Hugh Ferriss’s works created to illustrate the 1916 zoning law.

Original Article: Curbed