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Open House Insider: 3 Two-Bedroom Apartments to See This Weekend

DNAinfoFebruary 25, 2016

MANHATTAN — The two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment is considered a coveted piece of New York real estate. Here are three at a rage of price points with open houses this weekend.

 

188 Woodpoint Rd., #PHB, East Williamsburg

Two bedrooms/Two baths

Approximately 956 square feet

Condo

$900,000

Common charges: $400 a month

Taxes: $50 a month

Open House: Feb. 28, noon to 1:30 p.m.

 

Lowdown: Besides two bedrooms and two bathrooms, this East Williamsburg condo comes with another huge perk: two private outdoor spaces.

 

On the main floor of the apartment, there's a balcony off the living room. “It's just a sitting balcony,” said CORE broker Win Brown. “You could fit little cafe tables or plantings.”

 

From the second floor, which houses the master bedroom, there's a terrace that faces east and south, toward Bushwick and Queens.

 

“It's big,” said Brown. “You could do whatever you wanted up there.” The current owners set up lounge furniture, a BBQ and planting pots.

 

The apartment gets tons of light, Brown said, especially from the glass doors leading to the outdoor spaces. The living room also has double height, 18-foot ceilings with two large windows underneath.

 

The owners were the first buyers of this condo, built in 2011. They've added central air conditioning and heat since their purchase.

 

This will be the third open house for the apartment.

 

Location: This development is located off Graham Avenue, which Brown called “the main attraction east of the BQE.” The drag is lined with bars and restaurants. Trendy butcher the Meat Hook is opening there this week. From the apartment, it's about three blocks to the Graham Avenue L train.

 

Why put it on your open house calendar? “It's the best price you'll find for a two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo in Williamsburg,” Brown said.

Brooklyn's 20 Most Expensive Residential Sales

The Real DealFebruary 25, 2016

While the highly sought after historic townhouses of Brooklyn Heights again dominated The Real Deal's list of priciest Brooklyn sales in 2015, the year's top sale closed in Cobble Hill for $15.5 million. Our very own Lawrence Treglia clocks in at #9 for his sale at 114 Amity Street.

Is It Worth Renovating to Raise Your Apartment's Potential Sale Price?

Brick UndergroundFebruary 22, 2016

Q: I’ve owned my small NYC apartment for 20 years, and have recently started to price out the cost of renovations. (I've been quoted $30,000 to $40,000 for the kitchen; $25,000 to $30,000 for the bathroom; $20,000 for a floor replacement; and $100,000 to $130,000 for a total gut.) My question is this: How much value can I really expect to get out of this kind of work, if I want to sell? I've been told that in this city, renovations are considered outdated after seven years.

 

While some wisely chosen upgrades will boost your potential sale price, it's likely not worth laying out tens of thousands of dollars (and months of reno-related headaches) if your only goal is to raise your apartment's value for an impending sale, say our experts.

 

"Renovating to sell is a very different proposition than renovating to remain in the home," explains CORE Executive Vice President of Sales Douglas Heddings. "Renovating to sell is more of a business proposition in that the owner, with advice from a broker and/or designer, needs to choose cost-effective upgrades that maximize profit upon sale."  If you're renovating for your own long-term use and quality of life, you can feel more free to choose finishes that fit your specific tastes, and splash out on high-end appliances that you know you'll use every day. That is, with the knowledge that you'll most likely recoup your investment on an eventual sale, but won't do much more than break even.

 

The prices you've been quoted do line up with citywide averages for renovations, says Bolster founder Fraser Patterson, and if you want to price out specific return on investment, it's worth looking over the most recent edition of the Remodeling Cost vs. Value report, which has estimates of the cost (and estimated resale value) of different renovation projects in the NYC market.

 

Even so, if you're doing renovations this large (and costly) just in the hopes of boosting your sales price, the amount of difference it will make depends on the size and price point of your apartment, as well as how dramatic a difference the upgrades will make, says Corcoran's Deanna Kory. "For example, if you have a one-bedroom, and the price ranges in the neighborhood are $695,000 to $850,000," says Kory. "It's possible that unrenovated you could get around $700,000, and renovated you could achieve around $800,000 to $850,000. So in that case, if your contractor is correct and the amount you're spending is around $130,000 or $140,000 you would just about break even."

 

All of which raises a natural follow-up question: how do you decide what updates are worth spending money on if you're not doing a full-scale renovation? While there are some classic affordable-but-visually-high-impact updates like new fixtures, countertops, and backsplash, to figure out what works best for your particular apartment you'd do well to bring in some outside expertise. "Ask a real estate broker with experience in your building to look at your apartment, and get a professional’s take on what improvements would create the most impact and added value," suggests Gordon Roberts of Sotheby's International Realty. "They may have seen other apartments in your line, and make worthwhile recommendations based on the work of others, for instance, improving the floor plan in some way. You may even be surprised by what they recommend—it might be changing your window A/C to thru-wall, skim-coating walls, or increasing storage space, as opposed to new floors." (When it comes to staging for a sale, 'sleek and universally appealing' tends to win the day.)

 

Kory adds that with the right planning (and a savvy team in place), "You can spend less than $30,000 and still achieve $100,000+ increase in value."

 

As for the question of your work becoming outdated within seven years, this is a possibility, but the effects can be minimized by using classic materials like whites and neutral colors, and subway tiles if you're in a pre-war, says Bolster architect David Yum. "Some renovations are outdated the moment they are completed—highly personalized, idiosyncratic renovations can make a buyer think, 'I need to rip this out if we move in to this place,'" says Yum.  "Still, even a renovation that looks a bit tired will bring value since prospective buyers very often see the difference between seven-year-old work and 27-year-old fixtures.”

 

In sum, the scope of your work should depend entirely on your goals, your budget, and your patience for living through a renovation. "If you're going to live there, I would say go for it because you'll get your money out," says Kory. "But if you're doing it to sell the apartment, it's a lot of hassle and there's a risk as well that it may go higher in construction price, and so it's not usually wise to do a complete renovation in order to sell."

Winter Palaces

New York SpacesFebruary 19, 2016

These outstanding properties encompass all the space and amenities anyone could possibly desire.

 

38 Prince Street

 

7 bedroom, 7.5 baths; 8,069 square feet

 

Marvel Architects have transformed this landmarked Soho townhouse, once a wing of Old Saint Patrick’s School and Convent. The kitchen includes a La Cornue range and Smallbone cabinets. It leads through a casual dining room to a bi-level garden and outdoor kitchen. The master floor has a private study and a bath with Waterworks fixtures. The top two floors house a family room and playroom.

 

Listed at $25,000,000

 

Contact: Patrick Lilly, CORE, 212-612-9681 or plilly@corenyc.com

Alfa Development Taps Emily Beare of CORE as Exclusive Broker for 199 Mott Street Residence

The Mann NewswireFebruary 12, 2016

Alfa Development announced that they have selected Emily Beare, top-producing broker at luxury real estate group CORE, to sell Residence 2, the last remaining unit at 199 Mott. 199 Mott is an 11-unit boutique development located in the heart of Nolita, with each custom designed residence celebrating the history of the neighborhood. The building is the fourth in Alfa's Green Collection of sustainable residential developments.

 

Residence 2 is a 2,907-square-foot full-floor unit with three-bedrooms, three-bathrooms, and 1,500-square-feet of exterior space. 199 Mott is designed to reflect the modern lifestyle of the quintessential Nolita resident, with classic materials and turn of the century details. The residence has wide plank oak floor, 10" base moldings, and character grade European oak paneled doors, with oversized windows, a state of the art central air system, a loft kitchen that opens onto the living space, and ceilings over nine feet. The residence is listed at $7,775,000.

 

"Emily Beare is a talented broker and a strong new development marketing and sales force," said Michael Namer, Founder & CEO of Alfa Development. "We're confident that her industry expertise and knowledge of the luxury market will be instrumental in closing out sales at 199 Mott."

 

As with all projects in Alfa Development's Green Collection, interiors of 199 Mott feature various locally-sourced and sustainable materials, and it is a targeted LEED Gold certification condominium with a 24-hour doorman, storage, bike room, and rooftop lounge overlooking the city, with views of the Empire State Building, the Williamsburg Bridge and the East River. Period-specific details throughout the residence include tall raised panel doors, oiled bronze finishes and fixtures, and wide plank European oak flooring. The kitchen offers custom Siematic cabinetry and a suite of high-end appliances including a Bertazzoni Classic Collection stove and Siematic Chinese Wedding Cabinet refrigerator. Tailored marble clad bathrooms feature polished nickel fixtures and finishes from Lefroy Brooks' 19th century collection, a freestanding tub and Bosch washer and dryer.

Childhood School of Martin Scorsese On the Market for $25 Million

Le FigaroFebruary 12, 2016

The childhood school of Martin Scorsese is being transformed into a luxurious townhouse listed for $25,000,000 with CORE. Many believe it’s there at the school where he wrote his first stories. Located at 32 Prince Street in the historic neighborhood of Nolita in Manhattan, the five-story property has seven bedrooms, seven bathrooms, three bathrooms, a cellar and a private elevator.

 

The school, transformed by Marvel Architects, has nevertheless kept its original structure and original features including high ceilings, paneled doors, oak flooring, moldings and grand fireplaces. 

Romance-Ready Bedrooms Perfect for V-Day Canoodling

BrickUndergroundFebruary 12, 2016

In a city of millions of people and small apartments, finding a spot to spend time with your Valentine can be a bit of a challenge. Not so if you have one of these “sexy” bedrooms—defined for our purposes as a a space large enough for two, offering a degree of privacy and, perhaps, a little something extra to set an appropriately amorous ambiance.

 

With its tall ceilings (overlooking a garden, no less), bay window, carved fireplace and adjacent terrace, this master bedroom within a lovely Anglo-Italianate townhouse at 243 East 17th Street (priced at $15 million) will set a romantic mood.

Inside Look: A $15 Million 'Anglo-Italianate' Mansion Sits In Gramercy

MetroFebruary 10, 2016

What exactly is an “Anglo-Italianate" home?

 

It's this mansion-like townhouse located on Stuyvesant Square Park, according to CORE, which lists the massive residence at 243 E. 17th St. for $15 million.

 

What does $15 million get you?

 

- A 28-foot wide home dating back to the 1850s.


- Five stories in 6,494 square feet, with an additional 1,950 square feet on the lower level, or five-bedrooms, with a four-story owner's residence and two one-bedroom units.


- An elevator, two washer/dryers and five fireplaces.


- A music room, media room and front garden.


- Plus a grand winding staircase and private terrace for the master suite.

 

Though billed as a townhouse, CORE broker Emily Beare, describes the Gramercy home as "one of the very few grand mansions located downtown."

 

"It exudes a certain stately elegance that’s been preserved throughout the years. There’s really nothing else like it.” she said.

 

The photos of the inside will truly make you forget that New York City is full of small, cramped apartments, and does feature actual homes that would even make suburbanites jealous. Enjoy your escape.

Alfa Development Taps Emily Beare of CORE as Exclusive Broker for 199 Mott Street Residence

CityBizListFebruary 10, 2016

Alfa Development announced today that they have selected Emily Beare, top-producing broker at luxury real estate group CORE, to sell Residence 2, the last remaining unit at 199 Mott. 199 Mott is an 11-unit boutique development located in the heart of Nolita, with each custom designed residence celebrating the history of the neighborhood. The building is the fourth in Alfa’s Green Collection of sustainable residential developments.

 

Residence 2 is a 2,907-square-foot full-floor unit with three-bedrooms, three-bathrooms, and 1,500-square-feet of exterior space. 199 Mott is designed to reflect the modern lifestyle of the quintessential Nolita resident, with classic materials and turn of the century details. The residence has wide plank oak floor, 10” base moldings, and character grade European oak paneled doors, with oversized windows, a state of the art central air system, a loft kitchen that opens onto the living space, and ceilings over nine feet. The residence is listed at $7,775,000.

 

“Emily Beare is a talented broker and a strong new development marketing and sales force,” said Michael Namer, Founder & CEO of Alfa Development. “We’re confident that her industry expertise and knowledge of the luxury market will be instrumental in closing out sales at 199 Mott.”

 

As with all projects in Alfa Development’s Green Collection, interiors of 199 Mott feature various locally-sourced and sustainable materials, and it is a targeted LEED Gold certification condominium with a 24-hour doorman, storage, bike room, and rooftop lounge overlooking the city, with views of the Empire State Building, the Williamsburg Bridge and the East River. Period-specific details throughout the residence include tall raised panel doors, oiled bronze finishes and fixtures, and wide plank European oak flooring. The kitchen offers custom Siematic cabinetry and a suite of high-end appliances including a Bertazzoni Classic Collection stove and Siematic Chinese Wedding Cabinet refrigerator. Tailored marble clad bathrooms feature polished nickel fixtures and finishes from Lefroy Brooks’ 19th century collection, a free-standing tub and Bosch washer and dryer.

Martin Scorsese’s Childhood School Will Soon Be an Enviable Manhattan Apartment

Architectural DigestFebruary 09, 2016

A five-level 1825 townhouse in Nolita is on the market for $25 million.

 

Stats 
7 Bedrooms 
7 Baths 
3 Half Baths 
8,069 sq. ft. 
$25 million

 

Once the home of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral School and Convent, where Academy Award–winning director Martin Scorsese studied as a boy, this New York landmark has been transformed into a residential townhouse by Marvel Architects as part of the new Residences at Prince. The Federal-meets-Greek-Revival style residence, which still boasts its original 1825 façade, is set to be completed in fall 2016, in Nolita’s most historic section. Within its storied walls, the townhouse showcases five levels of living space with stunning details, such as high ceilings, five-inch-wide oak plank flooring, paneled doors, period-style moldings, and three fireplaces. An elevator provides easy access to each floor. With windows on three sides, the home boasts views of the cloistered cathedral and a private garden. Highlights include an exquisite parlor floor with a formal living room, dining room, and curved staircase. There’s a large open kitchen and casual dining room that leads to a bi-level garden with an outdoor kitchen. The master bedroom suite is located on its own floor with a private study and spalike bath, while a family room and playroom can be found on the top two floors.

Upper East Side Co-op Asks $780,000, New Kitchen Included

CurbedFebruary 05, 2016

Prewar co-op kitchens are not the stuff of today's real estate fantasies: they're notoriously tiny and closed off. Ripping them out is the number-one way to transform a dated space, and that's exactly what the buyers of this one-bedroom Upper East Side apartment did. After they sealed the deal for $550,000 in 2011, the buyers embarked on a renovation that brought the apartment a sleek new kitchen that opens it up to the living area. The bathroom also got an aesthetic update, with a glass shower enclosure. Four years later the apartment is back on the market asking $780,000 (and looking a heck of a lot more modern.)

The J. Crew CEO's Apartment Looks Exactly Like You Think It Does

Huffington PostFebruary 01, 2016

All you need is a cool $25 million.

 

Hold on to your henleys, people. Curbed reports J. Crew CEO Mickey Drexler hasre-listed his massive New York City pad -- and when we get a look into the home of a J. Crew exec, we take it. 

 

At $25 million, Drexler's home is listed for $10 million below the asking price when it was listed for sale back in 2015 (what a bargain!). The home has 6,226 square feet - a mansion by Manhattan standards- and features an open floor plan. The five-bedroom, seven-and-a-half-bathroom home has three walk-in closets and is located in the heart of NYC's coveted Tribeca neighborhood.

 

With its floor-to-ceiling windows and mid-century vibe, the apartment is downright stunning.

 

A spokeswoman for the listing real estate brokerage firm, Core, declined to comment on the sale, but you can get more information on the property at corenyc.com.

Top Reasons for Co-op Board Rejections

StreetEasy BlogFebruary 01, 2016

So you want to buy a co-op and you’ve done all the leg work and you’re gearing up to take on the co-op board. The bad news is that co-op boards in New York City can operate with complete impunity. Unless a board violates the city’s Human Rights Law (which prohibits rejections for reasons of race, sex, age, etc.), the board can reject you for whatever reason it wants. Oh, and the board has no obligation to tell you why. Here are the top reasons why potential buyers are rejected by co-op boards.

 

Bad Financials

 

First and foremost, if the board believes that you don’t have enough liquid assets in reserve after closing costs, or if they think you’ve been dishonest about your financial situation, they will reject you. Generally, boards require buyers to show 1-2 years of “post-closing liquidity” to cover mortgage and maintenance payments. In rare cases, if a board feels there is some financial risk, it will ask a buyer to put a year’s worth of maintenance fees in escrow. A general rule of thumb is for buyers to spend up to 25 percent of their earnings on mortgage and maintenance fees. Any higher and the board gets nervous.

 

“From experience, the most common cause for board rejections is due to buyers not being prepared or transparent,” said CORE real estate agent Martin Eiden. “Let’s take the latter first. Purchase applications for both co-ops and condos require full financial disclosure as well as background checks (credit, criminal and personal references).  For incomplete packages, condos will sit on the application until it is complete. Co-ops will just reject the applicant and move on.”

 

Boards also generally become suspicious if your income fluctuates wildly, or if you had a recent huge influx in cash, suggesting a parent or some other guardian angel is helping you out financially. If you need a guarantor, make sure your broker only applies to co-ops that are guarantor-friendly. In those cases, boards often require years of tax returns and verification of income and assets from your guarantor.

Unfortunately, it goes without saying that bad credit and heavy debt are big red flags for co-op boards.

 

You Want to Use It As a Pied-à-Terre

 

Boards often are skeptical of buyers who plan to use their property as a pied-à-terre. If you are not planning to use this apartment as your primary residence, make sure your broker only shows you co-ops where the board is OK with this.

 

Erratic Employment History

 

Boards love stability. Red flags pop up if you’ve changed jobs frequently in recent years, if your income has varied wildly, or if you’ve moved apartments often (suggesting potential disputes with former landlords). Make sure to explain in your application the truthful reasons for any instability in your life and how it absolutely will not affect your ability to afford this apartment.

 

Your Lifestyle

 

Unfair though it may seem, lifestyle concerns are often a major point of contention. If the board believes that, as a neighbor, you will bring undue stress and annoyance into their lives (you play a loud instrument, you are frequently the target of paparazzi, you have a ton of really big dogs, you’re known as a hard partying rock star…), you will be given the red light quickly.

 

A Bad Board Package

 

Don’t underestimate the power of a neat, thorough and truthful board package. Ideally, you’ll have a broker who has made deals with this co-op before, and understands the quirks of this particular board. It’s also helpful to have your broker work closely with the selling broker to make the board application as airtight as possible. Co-op members sitting on the board have busy lives, and generally are not interested in a lot of back and forth with potential buyers. If your board package brings up a lot of questions or loose ends, you’ll probably just end up rejected outright.

 

Poor Board Interview

 

Last, but certainly not least, is the No. 1 rule of thumb during the interview: Don’t be too chatty. Don’t offer up more information than necessary. Be polite, professional, charming – and save all your ideas for renovations or building improvements for when you’re a full-fledged board member yourself.

 

“Prospective buyers must be prepared when they go to a board interview and dress professionally,” said Eiden. “If they have nuances in their finances or unconventional careers, they need to have answers. Also, it helps if they know about the building and neighborhood. All experienced brokers will have a do’s and don’ts conversation with their buyers before a board interview.”

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