Real estate broker brings matchmaking skills to the dating world

VoeyurFebruary 10, 2012
Any single girl in New York can tell you: A good man — and a good apartment — are hard to find.

Lately, CORE managing director Vickey Barron has been helping clients do both.

She recently hosted an event at her listing at 256 W. 10th St. with matchmaker Samantha Daniels in the hopes of introducing her clients to their soul mates.

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“I can’t promise that I can find someone for you that will hold your hand through Central Park,” Barron said. “But I know that they have a great credit score, are employed and not wanted by the law.”

And, after enough bad OkCupid dates, that sounds like a pretty good catch.

Barron had Brooklyn-based design company WrecordsByMonkey make color-coded bracelets with a graphic based on the views from the West Village apartment. Attendees picked a color based on their neighborhood and had an instant ice breaker.

“It’s easy to ask someone where they live. Prewar or postwar? Condo or co-op,” Barron said.

Like most things dating, the beginning was awkward as men and women stayed in different areas of the apartment, middle-school dance style.

(NICO ARELLANO FOR CORE)

Drinks from the Natural Wine Company, small bites from Lievito Pizzeria and tiramisu from Dolce Vizio helped ease the discomfort. About an hour in, the crowd was buzzing and iPhones were out as people exchanged numbers.

Daniels, who invited about 20 of her clients to meet Barron’s invitees, was out mingling with guests.

“There’s the same sort of intangible chemistry in real estate that there is in dating,” Daniels said. “You can put people together that have things in common but if the chemistry isn’t there, it’s not going to work. It’s the same with apartments.”

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This one has a swoon-worthy wood-burning fireplace, a 35-foot-long living and dining space and a west-facing balcony.

A few days later, Barron thinks that there were three matches made.

But unfortunately, for those who only fell for the apartment, it’s taken. The $2.825 million one-bedroom is in contract.

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